Starting Over Is Not Easy ... Mother Baby Child Blog

I was over 35 when I gave birth to Baby Max. My younger son was 11 years old and my older son had just turned seventeen. It wasn't easy starting over again ... Mother Baby Child is a blog to share parenting experiences, as well as what marriage is like after being a single mom for so many years. Get info on having a baby, raising children, babies, tweens, teens, homeschooling, mom blogs, work at home mom. business marketing, Christian and celebrity moms blog posts.
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How Far Back Can You Remember? Childhood Memories, Experiences & Expert Advice

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I had a though while singing my baby to sleep ...

I had Max in my arms and Jonny sitting next to me on the couch. We were singing some of the songs that I used to sing to Jonny and Nate when they were younger. Some were from our favorite musicals. I then proceeded with a few songs that Jonny didn't know. This led to good old 'Brahms's Lullaby' (Lullaby and Goodnight). The next thing I knew, I was singing 'The Sidewalks of New York' ... I hadn't sang that song in years. Now that I am older, I realize that I sing it in a very soft, sweet, tone as if singing a lullaby.

My thought was actually a memory ...

I hadn't sang or heard 'The Sidewalks of New York' in almost 12 years (since Jonny was a baby). The funny thing is that I sing it softly like my step mother did. I'll have to ask her how young I was when she taught that to me, but I do remember her singing the same two songs to me - back to back - as a toddler.

Wow, a flashback from when I was a toddler ... 

A close friend of mine shared that she can remember as far back as being a baby. She remembers laying in her crib, though not being able to lift herself. She remembers seeing her mother from the crib ... It is pretty cool how vividly she explains it ...

How far back can you remember?

I read an article on Discovery Health stating that it is rare to remember before the age 3 ... Adults have something that Sigmund Freud called, infantile amnesia. Experts now call it childhood amnesia. The most interesting part of the article is that we can start forming long term memories in our infants as early as 3 to 6 months ... This is exciting to me because I want to get Baby Signing Time and Your Baby Can Read for our son, Max. I was wondering how early I should introduce it to him. Anyways, here's the link to the Discovery Health article if interested in checking it out: Can a person remember being born?

Is this correct? Can you remember anything from before you were 3 years old? Let us know in the comment section below.


In Motherly Love,
Mother Baby Child

"how far back can a child remember" + "how young can you remember memories"

Penélope Cruz Baby Boy Leo Encinas (January 26, 2011)

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Penélope Cruz baby boy named Leo Encinas born December 27, 2010
Penélope Cruz's Baby Boy: Leo Encinas - Isn't He Beautiful?

Can you believe that Penélope Cruz (Age 36) and Javier Bardem had their baby boy ONE MONTH after we had baby Max and one day earlier than Christina Applegate? TOO COOL!!!! Their baby boy's name is Leo Encinas and the picture above shows that he is quite the precious one. I love that although this celebrity mom is very private about her personal life, Penélope Cruz did not play with the tabloids and released this picture so soon.

I wish this Celebrity mommy all of the happiness in the world. Blessings to your family!


In Motherly Love,
Mother Baby Child

Newborn Pictures - Baby Smile - Baby Smiles

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The cutest picture of a newborn baby smiling
Isn't this one of the cutest pictures in the world? I am always amazed at how infant photographers get these babies to look so natural in their photos ... yes, this is just a neonatal smile ... but it is a darn good one, isn't it? Just an adorable shot! BTW, researchers now say that newborn babies' smiles aren't just gas, but real smiles develop at 2 to 8 weeks.

HERE IS MY NEWBORN BABY'S PICTURE:
http://motherbabychild.blogspot.com/2011/01/our-baby-boy-born-12-27-2010.html ... Of course I think that his is the cutest, but we all think that our baby's are the most beautiful people on they earth ... LOL :)

Please let us know where we can check out your newborn baby pictures, too!


Hope that you smiled!


In Motherly Love,
Mother Baby Child

Newborn Bowel Movements - Newborn Poop & Pee - Changing Diapers Is Not Fun!

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One of the troubling issues is whether a newborn is going to the bathroom enough and what to expect on a daily basis. Our hospital has us track the "wet diapers" and "bowel movements" for the 3 days we were in the hospital. It was a little annoying at times, but it reminded us to pay attention and know what to expect from our newborn. This is a guide that you can use to make sure that all is well with your newborn and / or what we experienced with our baby, Max.

NEWBORN WET DIAPER / NEWBORN PEE / NEWBORN URINE

There are many suggestions as to what is the average, 5 to 6 wet diapers a day is commonly stated, but some newborns wet 10 or more diapers per day in their first month of life. It just depends ... you just want to make sure that your newborn's urine is a clear / golden color and that he / she wets sever 4 hours. Pinkish or dark yellow pee may mean that your baby is not getting enough breast milk / formula.

NEWBORN BOWEL MOVEMENTS / NEWBORN POOP

Know what t look for in your newborn baby poop
Meconium
This is the extremely dark poop that you see in the picture to the left. All babies poop Meconium the first few days after birth (usually the 3rd day when the mother's milk comes in and she is no longer feeding the first milk). As you can see, it is black or very dark green in color and thick like tar. The plus is that it does not smell like poop even though it looks ugly. Meconium is actual the most sterile poop your baby will ever have because it is comprised of what your baby consumed while in the uterus. Colostrum, the first milk that the mother produces, works a a laxative and helps a newborn baby get rid of the meconium in their system.

Newborn Baby Poop - Breast Fed Baby

This is the "seedy" poop that you keep reading / hearing about. It is typically a dark mustard color, though can be as light as a yellow mustard or more on the green side as well, and is seedy / grainy. The texture is not even close to the thickness of the first bowl movements (Meconium) or bottle fed babies. It is more liquid-like, though should not be slimy (with a bunch of mucus) nor too runny either. It is just a looser poop that is thinner than your own and appears to have seeds in it. Meanwhile, these are not seeds at all. They are more like specks of firmer poop that looks a little like oatmeal or flattened risotto noodles. It is just how the baby's body digests the mother's milk and of no harm at all. Some say that it does not stink, but it does have an odor that changes depending upon what the mother has eaten and the health of your baby. Ideally, it is a sweeter smelling poop to most, though oddly sweet and not attractive enough for you to yearn (like perfume). On the other hand, it can get pretty nasty at times; especially in the first month of when a mother is adjusting to breast feeding and a baby's system is adjusting to the world. Therefore, texture, color and smell may fluctuate ... it stables out in time with proper diet, feeding patterns and maturing of baby's digestive system.

* Breast fed babies poop more than bottle fed babies; usually 4 to 6 times a day.

* If milk is green, try breastfeeding your baby longer to give enough of the hindmilk.

* Breast fed babies rarely become constipated.

Newborn Poop - Formula Fed Baby

Formula fed babies have poop that is yellow-brown color, stronger smell and a bit thicker in consistence than breast fed babies. Some compare it to the texture of peanut butter. * If any harder than that, then your baby could be constipated or is becoming constipated.

* Formula fed babies poop less than breast fed babies; one to two times a day.

What is normal baby poop and what is not normal bowel movements?

Hard poop, green poop, dark, slimy, red / pinkish, blood in stool and chalk white poop ... these are not normal poops. Similac has an excellent resource for what breast fed and formula fed baby poop looks like. It includes samples for poop of babies that are on solid foods as well as warning of what is and is not normal poop: http://similac.com/feeding-nutrition/diaper-decoder - Off hand, Green Poop / Green bowel movements are an indication that a breast fed baby is getting more foremilk (sweet / watery milk that flows fast at the beginning) and less hindmilk (fatty milk / richer milk that flows after the hindmilk); also green poop is indicative of how babies are digesting iron.

LET YOUR DOCTOR KNOW IF GREEN POOP DOES NOT CLEAR UP OR IF ANYTHING IN YOUR BABY'S DIAPER IS ABNORMAL!

I know this blog post is kinda gross, but we all have to clean baby poop :)


In Motherly Love,
Mother Baby Child

Should I Give My Baby A Pacifier?

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Is it ok to give my baby a pacifier?
Picture of Newborn Baby Max - 2 Days Old - December 2011

Although the nurse advised against my using a pacifer in the hospital, I am SO GLAD that I made her bring us one. I also suggest that all breastfeeding mothers have one ready once their baby is comfortable feeding and doing well with it. In our case, my baby was able to distinguish between whether he wanted to nurse or suckle by the time he was 2 1/2 weeks. He would instinctively reach one hand to his mouth and do a quick poke to signify that he was checking for his pacifier. On the other hand, he would rub both hands and make a quick panting sound when he wanted to nurse. This was extremely helpful to my adjusting breasts because he was only using them to eat (i.e. babies can become adamant about wanting suckle on the breast and this can become painful situation).

In case you're wondering ... NO, he does not consistently want nor rely on the pacifier 24 hours a day. Our baby learned how to pop his pacifier out by week 2. At first, it was an accident, but by week 3, he could, clumsily, push it out with his index finger. He was letting is drop out of his mouth when ready to nurse or coo - "popping it out" - soon after.

Coming into the world is not an easy adjustment for babies. It is our job to make it as comforting and safe as possible. Do not hesitate to use a pacifier if you think that your baby needs it. There are all different types - even a style suggested to prevent S.I.D.S. - try a few and see which your baby prefers. Our baby will block the pacifier with his tongue when he wants the other style (NUK) or does not want a pacifier at all.

Did your nurse advise against giving your baby a pacifier? Did you give your baby a pacifer? Let us know your experience in the comment section below!


In Motherly Love,
Mother Baby Child

Newborn Baby Smile

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Do newborn babies smile? Here's my son's newborn baby picture. He is smiling (a neonatal smile) but very cute!
Neonatal Smiling OR Do babies show emotion in the first few weeks?

My mother reminded me that newborn babies do not smile. It is said that a newborn baby displays a spontaneous reflex that appears to be an intentional smile, though it is not an actual sign of affection. This is referred to as neonatal smiling. Neonatal smiles occur when the baby is sleeping and during the time when he / she is transitioning between sleep and wake time. These are not from gas. On the contrary, researchers now believe that baby smiles aren't just gas - they’re real smiles that start between 2 - 8 weeks.

Babies start displaying emotion between 1 to 2 months ...

I was holding my one month son on my chest this morning. I was admiring how strong he is becoming while he bobbed his little head up to look at me. Out of the blue, he let out the most adorable smile that I have seen yet. It was not a little closed mouth smirk, but a huge, open mouthed, smile just at the moment when he saw my face ... He did it a few times and it obviously made my heart melt. I quickly referred to my baby books, and online baby resources, to see if this was a "real smile". I was excited to read that it was very likely an intentional / emotional smile. It also means that he is starting to see more clearly.

As a newborn gets older, she / he will smile more often as vision becomes more clear and other developmental factors progress normally; especially in response to your loving smiles. Isn't it just wonderful to watch your newborn baby develop?


In Motherly Love,
Mother Baby Child

Homeschooling ... Again!

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Homeschooling Pre-Teens (Tweens) and Teens in virtual school programs

To Homeschool - OR - Not To Homeschool ... 


Well, here we go again ... I have a great kid that is sometimes picked on by teachers and other kids because he has some "special needs". He does OK at school and making friends, but I want more for him than "No Child Left Behind" as a crutch the classrooms use to let him pass by. Unfortunately, he had to transfer him to a new middle school when we moved to a new community. I had no concern because it is in a decent area and just a few minutes from home. BOY was I wrong about this one. In less than two weeks, he was forced to protect himself during gym class and the teacher did not even know that there was a fight in his class. Plus, two  different students offered my son drugs and cigarettes at school. Yes, all are pre-teens in the 6th grade ... My son said that he did not even know their names.

I thank God that he still reports these types of situations at home!

The irony is that I dare not make my son point out these kids and have the school both the teacher and the kids that fought him and offered him drugs. They will torture him for the rest of the year (trust me, I have years of experience in such matters). Meanwhile, now that my son is in 6th grade, no one makes sure that he is OK, though he is supposed to be somewhat protected by an IEP and ESE seclusion. I've had enough!  At this point in life, I understand why Christian homeschool parents are so adamant about secluding their children ... it is not that they think they are better ... they do not want to hope  that their children will rise above the influence. They are making sure that their children are not just getting throne to the wolves in a contradictory educational system and world. For example, if my son tells that he was bullied and fought back, he will get in trouble for not telling someone before he had action in it. Meanwhile, I have never heard of a fight stopping for a child to tell and then come back to deal with the situation as the school wants them to do.  There have been numerous occasions when he has told me that he does not tell the teachers or counselors anything, anymore, because they do not do anything to make situations better. It just gets worse and he does not want to risk an even more of an uncomfortable situation.

Yes, I understand that kids experience these challenges on a daily basis ... 

When my older son was in 6th grade, I chose to pull him out to homeschool. He had always been in very small, private, schools and was not transitioning well in his first year of public school (6th grade year). Aside of some emotional immaturity issues, there were some pretty nasty teachers that would not help him adjust in their classes and kids that tired to challenge him "the new kid". This really bummed me out because I moved our family to that community because the schools had upper percentile ranks and was surrounded by other excellent (upper percentile) school districts ...

My older son homeschooled for 6th grade. I subsided to pressure from family and friends, as well as his pleading to the same ... he went back to school the following year (7th grade) ... he made plenty of friends, but he never did fit in with the school and teachers. A lot went down hill after this year and he actually ended back in homeschool by 10th grade.

YOU CAN STILL CONTROL YOUR CHILD UP UNTIL A CERTAIN AGE (PRETEEN YEARS), AND THEN IT IS TOUCH AND GO ...BY HIGH SCHOOL ... PEER PRESSURE CAN CAPTURE THE BEST OF THEM! 

My second son in now in 6th grade. It has been quite a challenging year and I assure you that even the best public schools in Tampa Bay do not compare to even the mid range school districts in Pittsburgh. Regardless, we had a decent Tampa elementary school experience for the second half of 5th grade (when we moved here) and a frustrating, though safe middle school for the 1st half of the year, BUT WE MOVED to a different part of town at Christmas time. It is a quiet area, but the school is rough. In fact, my son was in a fight during gym class and the teacher did not even know that it occurred in the class. On the other hand, other 6th graders were exposing him to drugs and cigarettes at school ... when he came home explaining how large the bags of drugs were, I pulled this second child out to protect him from what my older son fell into by the end of middle school. In this case, I am not letting anyone talk me into putting him back into a Tampa public school. Aside of these issues, there were always details where he needed more help at school, but the school was treating him like all of the other kids though his IEP and needs would warrant more help. Focusing is not a strength of his, therefore he developed some adaptive skills that were unnecessary if he had some help. For example, he would wear his gym clothes under his clothes (no matter how bulky) or carry them in his backpack if needed because it takes him more time to open a combination locker than the other kids. If he used the locker, then he would be late for class and was too embarrassed to ask for help. There are other examples, but you get the point.

Considering my experiences with pre-teens and teens over the past few years, hearing what other parents explain as their experiences and my obsession with national stats on the subject ... I think that our public educational system fails children after the elementary years; this applies to some private school systems, too. This is much more than the old China vs USA stats ... In a simpler effort, if you take a look at School Matter and start comparing the elementary, middle and grade school scores, you can see a little pattern of how the decrease occurs even in good school districts. Check throughout the nation and you will see some saddening results.

The United States would be better if they would restructure the educational system to better prepare children for the middle school transition. It would help to break middle and high schools up into smaller schools of 5th and 6th, 7th and 8th, 9th and 10th, 11th and 12th. all separate schools ... Additionally, what these school districts fail to understand is that sending a 6th grader to school with 8th graders is as ugly as sending a 9th grader to school with 12th graders. For the first 1/2 of 6th grade, my son would tell me how an 8th grade couple would "make out" between the boy and girl gym lockers. He thought it was funny and it made me remember what it was like in the Middle School (I transferred from private school to a public school in 8th grade) and not only were we with the 6th and 7th graders, we had a lot of space to roam in the school as well. We even rode the bus with the younger children and they flocked to us as if they were 8th graders too ... the reality is that they were NOT into what we were into, they just hung with us enough to get the exposure.

Most younger children are watching and aspiring to become one of the popular "upper class men" and, although 6th grade is only 2 years or 3 years apart from 8th or 9th grade, there are huge developmental and maturation gaps between the ages. This is the same for 9th and 12th graders. In addition to this, the busing systems, in certain counties and communities is just NUTS! Also, why do they put kindergarteners on the bus with 3rd and 4th graders? Why do they put middle schoolers on the bus with high schoolers? This is not the case in our school district, but I have researched certain areas and this is how some of their busing structures work ...

It is like setting the children up for peer pressure and academic failure.

Things are so bad right now that it makes no sense to put our kids "to the test" by keeping them in schools where teachers are not paying attention and are more focused on making sure they pass state testing then watching out for their flocks. Additionally, alcohol and drug usage, depression and peer pressure are obviously ignored and undetected. It is a constant battle for a "good kid" to stay clear of peer pressure and quietly abide by teachers who are pressure to get students to pass a test that will save their jobs ...

The virtual school programs are fantastic for those who are able to stay home or can hire someone to help their children do well at homeschooling. Although you can only shelter but so long and homeschool children need socialization, it is a heck of a lot better when you can help them avoid some of the negative experiences and surround them with children that are like them, and teachers that actually help when needed.

Do you believe in homeschooling or public school education? Share your experiences, opinion and / or tips for other parents that are considering homeschooling!



In Motherly Love,
Mother Baby Child

1st Doctor Appointment

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1st doctor's appointment for newborn baby is one week after leaving the hospital
Newborn picture of Baby Max - January 2011

Max had his 1st well baby check up and I sure had mixed feelings about it. One part of me hated our medical system and the insensitive health officials that say that we should take our babies to a doctors office a week after they are born. Sick people go to doctors ... it should not include newborn babies. On the other hand, I was anxious to confirm that our baby is healthy and ready to take on life. It was bitter sweet ... you will read / hear say this often ... as if we bring children into the world to expose them to contradiction that we cannot explain, nor ignore, any more than "this is just how it is".

Regardless, our baby boy has put his 7.7 lbs birth weight back on (it is common for newborns to lose weight while in the hospital). Both the nurse and doctor say that Max is just fine; a healthy baby boy. Both his father and I are grateful that Max is healthy. I just cannot believe it!

First of all, I am well over 35 years old and never could have imagined that I would have one more child. I am jumping for joy, but still in disbelief by it all. I was a single parent for so many years ... I never would have though and am thanking God every day. My two sons love Baby Max so much. How could they not? They just about helped me deliver him.

They told me that Max should have a 6 week check up next, but my immunization chart says 2 months. I am confused, but am taking all in stride since it has been so long since I've had a baby. He had the 1st Hepatitis shot in the hospital and will need his 1st set of immunizations at his next appointment. I am nervous about those 1st shots :(


In Motherly Love,
Mother Baby Child

Vaccination Schedule / Immunization Schedule - Newborns, Babies, Children, Teenagers

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immunization / vaccination schedule newborn, babies, children, teens
Printable Immunization / Vaccination Schedule For Children Ages 0 To 18 Years
  • Hepatitis B vaccine (HepB).
  •  (Minimum age: birth) At birth:
    • Administer monovalent HepB to all newborns before hospital discharge.
    • If mother is hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive, administer HepB and 0.5 mL of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) within 12 hours of birth.
    • If mother's HBsAg status is unknown, administer HepB within 12 hours of birth. Determine mother's HBsAg status as soon as possible and, if HBsAg-positive, administer HBIG (no later than age 1 week).
    Doses following the birth dose:
    • The second dose should be administered at age 1 or 2 months. Monovalent HepB should be used for doses administered before age 6 weeks.
    • Infants born to HBsAg-positive mothers should be tested for HBsAg and antibody to HBsAg 1 to 2 months after completion of at least 3 doses of the HepB series, at age 9 through 18 months (generally at the next well-child visit).
    • Administration of 4 doses of HepB to infants is permissible when a combination vaccine containing HepB is administered after the birth dose.
    • Infants who did not receive a birth dose should receive 3 doses of HepB on a schedule of 0, 1, and 6 months.
    • The final (3rd or 4th) dose in the HepB series should be administered no earlier than age 24 weeks.
  • Rotavirus vaccine (RV). (Minimum age: 6 weeks)
    • Administer the first dose at age 6 through 14 weeks (maximum age: 14 weeks 6 days). Vaccination should not be initiated for infants aged 15 weeks 0 days or older.
    • The maximum age for the final dose in the series is 8 months 0 days
    • If Rotarix is administered at ages 2 and 4 months, a dose at 6 months is not indicated.
  • Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP). (Minimum age: 6 weeks)
    • The fourth dose may be administered as early as age 12 months, provided at least 6 months have elapsed since the third dose.
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (Hib). (Minimum age: 6 weeks)
    • If PRP-OMP (PedvaxHIB or Comvax [HepB-Hib]) is administered at ages 2 and 4 months, a dose at age 6 months is not indicated.
    • Hiberix should not be used for doses at ages 2, 4, or 6 months for the primary series but can be used as the final dose in children aged 12 months through 4 years.
  • Pneumococcal vaccine. (Minimum age: 6 weeks for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine [PCV]; 2 years for pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine [PPSV])
    • PCV is recommended for all children aged younger than 5 years. Administer 1 dose of PCV to all healthy children aged 24 through 59 months who are not completely vaccinated for their age.
    • A PCV series begun with 7-valent PCV (PCV7) should be completed with 13-valent PCV (PCV13).
    • A single supplemental dose of PCV13 is recommended for all children aged 14 through 59 months who have received an age-appropriate series of PCV7.
    • A single supplemental dose of PCV13 is recommended for all children aged 60 through 71 months with underlying medical conditions who have received an age-appropriate series of PCV7.
    • The supplemental dose of PCV13 should be administered at least 8 weeks after the previous dose of PCV7. See MMWR 2010:59(No. RR-11).
    • Administer PPSV at least 8 weeks after last dose of PCV to children aged 2 years or older with certain underlying medical conditions, including a cochlear implant.
  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV). (Minimum age: 6 weeks)
    • If 4 or more doses are administered prior to age 4 years an additional dose should be administered at age 4 through 6 years.
    • The final dose in the series should be administered on or after the fourth birthday and at least 6 months following the previous dose.
  • Influenza vaccine (seasonal). (Minimum age: 6 months for trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine [TIV]; 2 years for live, attenuated influenza vaccine [LAIV])
    • For healthy children aged 2 years and older (i.e., those who do not have underlying medical conditions that predispose them to influenza complications), either LAIV or TIV may be used, except LAIV should not be given to children aged 2 through 4 years who have had wheezing in the past 12 months.
    • Administer 2 doses (separated by at least 4 weeks) to children aged 6 months through 8 years who are receiving seasonal influenza vaccine for the first time or who were vaccinated for the first time during the previous influenza season but only received 1 dose.
    • Children aged 6 months through 8 years who received no doses of monovalent 2009 H1N1 vaccine should receive 2 doses of 2010–2011 seasonal influenza vaccine. See MMWR 2010;59(No. RR-8):33–34.
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR). (Minimum age: 12 months)
    • The second dose may be administered before age 4 years, provided at least 4 weeks have elapsed since the first dose.
  • Varicella vaccine. (Minimum age: 12 months)
    • The second dose may be administered before age 4 years, provided at least 3 months have elapsed since the first dose.
    • For children aged 12 months through 12 years the recommended minimum interval between doses is 3 months. However, if the second dose was administered at least 4 weeks after the first dose, it can be accepted as valid.
  • Hepatitis A vaccine (HepA). (Minimum age: 12 months)
    • Administer 2 doses at least 6 months apart.
    • HepA is recommended for children aged older than 23 months who live in areas where vaccination programs target older children, who are at increased risk for infection, or for whom immunity against hepatitis A is desired.
  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine, quadrivalent (MCV4). (Minimum age: 2 years)
    • Administer 2 doses of MCV4 at least 8 weeks apart to children aged 2 through 10 years with persistent complement component deficiency and anatomic or functional asplenia, and 1 dose every 5 years thereafter.
    • Persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who are vaccinated with MCV4 should receive 2 doses at least 8 weeks apart.
    • Administer 1 dose of MCV4 to children aged 2 through 10 years who travel to countries with highly endemic or epidemic disease and during outbreaks caused by a vaccine serogroup.
    • Administer MCV4 to children at continued risk for meningococcal disease who were previously vaccinated with MCV4 or meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine after 3 years if the first dose was administered at age 2 through 6 years.



  • Tetanus and diphtheria toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap).
  •  (Minimum age: 10 years for Boostrix and 11 years for Adacel)
    • Persons aged 11 through 18 years who have not received Tdap should receive a dose followed by Td booster doses every 10 years thereafter.
    • Persons aged 7 through 10 years who are not fully immunized against pertussis (including those never vaccinated or with unknown pertussis vaccination status) should receive a single dose of Tdap. Refer to the catch-up schedule if additional doses of tetanus and diphtheria toxoid–containing vaccine are needed.
    • Tdap can be administered regardless of the interval since the last tetanus and diphtheria toxoid–containing vaccine.
  • Human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV). (Minimum age: 9 years)
    • Quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4) or bivalent HPV vaccine (HPV2) is recommended for the prevention of cervical precancers and cancers in females.
    • HPV4 is recommended for prevention of cervical precancers, cancers, and genital warts in females.
    • HPV4 may be administered in a 3-dose series to males aged 9 through 18 years to reduce their likelihood of genital warts.
    • Administer the second dose 1 to 2 months after the first dose and the third dose 6 months after the first dose (at least 24 weeks after the first dose).
  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine, quadrivalent (MCV4). (Minimum age: 2 years)
    • Administer MCV4 at age 11 through 12 years with a booster dose at age 16 years.
    • Administer 1 dose at age 13 through 18 years if not previously vaccinated.
    • Persons who received their first dose at age 13 through 15 years should receive a booster dose at age 16 through 18 years.
    • Administer 1 dose to previously unvaccinated college freshmen living in a dormitory.
    • Administer 2 doses at least 8 weeks apart to children aged 2 through 10 years with persistent complement component deficiency and anatomic or functional asplenia, and 1 dose every 5 years thereafter.
    • Persons with HIV infection who are vaccinated with MCV4 should receive 2 doses at least 8 weeks apart.
    • Administer 1 dose of MCV4 to children aged 2 through 10 years who travel to countries with highly endemic or epidemic disease and during outbreaks caused by a vaccine serogroup.
    • Administer MCV4 to children at continued risk for meningococcal disease who were previously vaccinated with MCV4 or meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine after 3 years (if first dose administered at age 2 through 6 years) or after 5 years (if first dose administered at age 7 years or older).
  • Influenza vaccine (seasonal).
    • For healthy nonpregnant persons aged 7 through 18 years (i.e., those who do not have underlying medical conditions that predispose them to influenza complications), either LAIV or TIV may be used.
    • Administer 2 doses (separated by at least 4 weeks) to children aged 6 months through 8 years who are receiving seasonal influenza vaccine for the first time or who were vaccinated for the first time during the previous influenza season but only received 1 dose.
    • Children 6 months through 8 years of age who received no doses of monovalent 2009 H1N1 vaccine should receive 2 doses of 2010–2011 seasonal influenza vaccine. See MMWR 2010;59(No. RR-8):33–34.
  • Pneumococcal vaccines.
    • A single dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) may be administered to children aged 6 through 18 years who have functional or anatomic asplenia, HIV infection or other immunocompromising condition, cochlear implant or CSF leak. See MMWR 2010;59(No. RR-11).
    • The dose of PCV13 should be administered at least 8 weeks after the previous dose of PCV7.
    • Administer pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine at least 8 weeks after the last dose of PCV to children aged 2 years or older with certain underlying medical conditions, including a cochlear implant. A single revaccination should be administered after 5 years to children with functional or anatomic asplenia or an immunocompromising condition.
  • Hepatitis A vaccine (HepA).
    • Administer 2 doses at least 6 months apart.
    • HepA is recommended for children aged older than 23 months who live in areas where vaccination programs target older children, or who are at increased risk for infection, or for whom immunity against hepatitis A is desired.
  • Hepatitis B vaccine (HepB).
    • Administer the 3-dose series to those not previously vaccinated. For those with incomplete vaccination, follow the catch-up recommendations (Table).
    • A 2-dose series (separated by at least 4 months) of adult formulation Recombivax HB is licensed for children aged 11 through 15 years.
  • 8. Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV).
    • The final dose in the series should be administered on or after the fourth birthday and at least 6 months following the previous dose.
    • If both OPV and IPV were administered as part of a series, a total of 4 doses should be administered, regardless of the child's current age.
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR).
    • The minimum interval between the 2 doses of MMR is 4 weeks.
  • Varicella vaccine.
    • For persons aged 7 through 18 years without evidence of immunity (see MMWR 2007;56[No. RR-4]), administer 2 doses if not previously vaccinated or the second dose if only 1 dose has been administered.
    • For persons aged 7 through 12 years, the recommended minimum interval between doses is 3 months. However, if the second dose was administered at least 4 weeks after the first dose, it can be accepted as valid.
    • For persons aged 13 years and older, the minimum interval between doses is 4 weeks.

(Resource: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/737446) 



In Motherly Love,
Mother Baby Child

Mother Quotes | Mom Quotes

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I love referencing scriptures and quotes, so I thought it would be fun to make a page with the mom quotes that I like. Please feel free to comment below with your quotes about mothers and motherhood.

"“Honor your father and your mother, so that you may live long in the land the LORD your God is giving you." ~ Exodus 20:12

"I remember my mother's prayers and they have always followed me. They have clung to me all my life." ~Abraham Lincoln

Wife Quotes / Wife Scriptures

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"Her children arise and call her blessed; her husband also, and he praises her: "Many women do noble things, but you surpass them all." Charm is deceptive, and beauty is fleeting; but a woman who fears the LORD is to be praised. Give her the reward she has earned, and let her works bring her praise at the city gate." ~ Proverbs 31
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